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Beware of Trojan Horse!


Securing Wireless Network with WPA

We also offer network and wireless support solutions for your home office or small business.

It is important to secure your home wireless network.

Checklist:
1. Disable the SSID broadcast.
Disable your wifi router from broadcasting it's wireless network name
2. Implement MAC address filtering
3. Change the default password on the access point
For example, SMC broadband router's default password is "smcadmin". Change this to something else.
4. Use encryption, WAP.

What is WPA? (A more secured protocol to protect your wireless network)

The WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) protocol is a powerful, standards-based, interoperable security technology for wireless local area networks (subset of IEEE Std 802.11i draft standard) that encrypts data sent over radio waves and is designed to be forward-compatible with 802.11i when it is finally published.

The WPA protocol has been developed to overcome the weaknesses of the WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) protocol.

In what ways are WPA better than WEP?

WPA seems to be a good improvement over WEP by providing improved encryption and simple, but robust, user authentication, that even home wireless networkers will be able to use

Does it cause speed difference?

There is only a slight difference in speed, but is not noticeable. The slow down in the local network speed does not matter at all. Your wireless network will not become the bottleneck anyway as your bandwidth from your ISP won't be anywhere near 11Mbps.

Why do I need to bother using WPA if it causes a little slowdown in speed?

The security gain by using encryption far outweighs leaving a open access point at factory defaults.

What is WPA? (A more secured protocol to protect your wireless network)

The WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) protocol is a powerful, standards-based, interoperable security technology for wireless local area networks (subset of IEEE Std 802.11i draft standard) that encrypts data sent over radio waves.

 

 

 

 
Last Update: 17 October 2002